Facebook API Changes

Jun 5, 2008 at 2:46 PM
I'm currently in the process of putting together a facebook app using Facebook.NET. I've noticed a lot of buzz around the changes that facebook will be making to the platform sometime in July (the 17th I believe) so my question is, how will Facebook.NET react to these changes? I'm worried that I'll put my application live and not soon after it will break when Facebook put their changes live.

For example on the following page they list a lot of the current API calls that are going to change:

http://wiki.developers.facebook.com/index.php/New_Design_Platform_Changes#Changes_to_Existing_Platform_Components

Should we expect to see a new version of Facebook.NET released before Facebook put their changes live so those developers using Facebook.NET can be ready for when they go live?

Thanks,

Matt
Jun 9, 2008 at 7:29 PM
Anyone?
Jun 10, 2008 at 4:33 PM
Edited Jun 10, 2008 at 4:42 PM
This is an issue with both the .net toolkits, developement on both seems to be a little quiet. changes to existing api functions aren't too substantial, but they'll still need to be changed in the toolkits before they're depreciated. New functionality is another issue.


interesting you mention the 17th of July as a release date, where did you read this?    
Jun 10, 2008 at 8:37 PM
I've sent a message to Nikhil about this. I'm hoping that he'll address this situation or at least announce that he won't be doing further development on this framework. If he doesn't post here, I'll summarize his response.

Bill
Jun 11, 2008 at 10:29 AM
Looks like there are new releases planned for the facebook developer toolkit now, http://www.codeplex.com/FacebookToolkit/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseName=Version%201.7 which is good news. I had missed this previously.
Jun 14, 2008 at 5:54 PM
Bill did you get a response from Nikhil?

Zeus > Can't remember exactly where I read it, I'm sure it was on one of the facebook developer blog posts.
Jun 17, 2008 at 10:21 PM
Nope, none at all. I'm weighing my options.

Bill
Jul 11, 2008 at 6:54 PM
I just got a response from Nikhil. He is interested in keeping the project active and we will start to discuss collaboration options ASAP. I will, as always, keep you apprised of everything as I come to know it.

I'm just glad that I'm not going to have to fork this. :-)

Bill
Jul 16, 2008 at 4:31 AM
Back in the Feb timeframe, I decided on Facebook.NET over the FacebookToolkit because I thought it was better architected. For what it's worth, it looks like there is active development being done on the FacebookToolkit, which is sometimes more valuable than the ease of development. They released a version back in mid-June with recent API changes and are targeting a new 2.0 release shortly.

Clarity Consulting http://www.claritycon.com has begun developing Version 2.0 of the toolkit. This will be a 4 week effort from Clarity finishing on August 1st. The goal of V2.0 of the toolkit is to:
1. Improve the out of the box experience
2. Refactor the code to make future development more straight forward
3. Implement new Facebook API's

As much as I prefer the Facebook.NET model, I have to admit this is making me consider them as we upgrade our Facebook app.

Additionally, I was able to implement the "authentication-only" piece with the new FacebookToolkit 1.7 code with 5 lines of code - and wasn't able to get this working at all with Facebook.NET since most classes are marked internal, etc.

So, just saying..
Jul 16, 2008 at 5:36 PM
I think Facebook.NET is better architected as well and I agree that its development pace has been unsatisfactory. We've had to make several changes to our own copy to accommodate new features and fix bugs. But that's just making do, not keeping up with the API changes.

In the end, you've got to go with what works for you and your app. I've invested the time and effort to learn the source and update it where necessary because it scratches my itch perfectly, but it may not be worth it to you. You should be glad that there's a choice in this because I've consumed frameworks that looked promising but ended up withering away with no alternatives. That sucks!

Luckily, the Facebook API changes aren't breaking Facebook.NET at this point and Facebook seems like they're going to roll this transition out as smoothly as possible. So we've got some time to get this house back in order. Be patient if you can, head to greener pastures if you can't. (If you can't, thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment.)

Bill